The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

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Colonel_Kurz
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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 05 nov 2011 01:35

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Geboren in Louisiana in 1930, gestorven in 1968.

Little Walter helped define the postwar Chicago blues sound with his peerless harmonica playing on the songs of Muddy Waters, after which he soon also started recording his own work. Walter was the first blues harp player to record amplified harmonica (on Muddy Waters “Long Distance Call”). Like Waters and Wolf, he was supplied his hits by Willie Dixon. He was known for his wild behavior and heavy drinking, and died at the early age of 37 after sustaining head injuries in a street fight.

Walter Marion Jacobs taught himself to play harmonica at the age of eight and ran away at twelve to become a street musician. He worked his way north until reaching Chicago in 1946. There he joined Muddy Waters, and the rest is history. Well, in 1952 he had his first solo hit with “Juke”. His best known song became the 1955 “My Babe”. He stayed with Chess until his death, recording his own songs and backing others.

Favoriete nummers:
Juke, Blue Midnight, Can't Hold Out Much Longer, Sad Hours, Driftin', Quarter To Twelve, My Babe, Temperature, Confessin' The Blues, Key to the Highway, Rock Bottom, Worried Life, Everything's Gonna Be Allright, Back Track, One of these Mornings, Blue and Lonesome, Up The Line.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 07 nov 2011 22:59

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Geboren in Georgia in 1901, gestorven in 1959.

“Nobody can sing the blues like Blind Willie McTell”, Bob Dylan sang in 1983 in tribute. He wasn't wrong. Born blind and raised in Statesboro, a few miles from Savannah. Which he immortalized in his “Statesboro Blues”, now mostly known for numerous covers like the Allman Brothers one. Willie recorded his first songs in 1927, after a few years of hoboing. He boasted an impressive repertoire that spanned blues, ragtime, gospel, dance tunes, pop and even country material, which allowed him to reach lots of different audiences. Even though he married in 1934, he kept travelling around, saying to his wife: “Baby, I was born a rambler. I'm gonna ramble until I die, but I'm preparing you to live after I'm gone.”

In 1940 he was playing for tips at a fastfood stand when John and Alan Lomax recorded him for the Library of Congress. It's the only recording of him between 1937 and 1948. All the while he rambled and played for tips. He returned to the studio in 1949. In 1950 he recorded as Pig'n'Whistle Red, the name of a whites only barbecue joint where he played for tips. In 1956 he made his last recording, because the year after he became a preacher and gave up the blues. He died in 1959 just before he could be rediscovered during the early sixties folk-blues revival.

Favoriete nummers:
Writin' Paper Blues, Stole Rider Blues, Statesboro Blues, You Can't Get Stuff No More, East St. Louis Blues, I Keep On Drinking, Don't You See How This World Made A Change, Death Cell Blues, Let Me Play With Yo' Yo-Yo, Dying Crapshooter's Blues.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 10 nov 2011 15:25

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Geboren in Texas circa 1902, gestorven in 1949 (of 1950)

Most of you will be familiar with the Ry Cooder slide guitar soundtrack of Paris, Texas. Cooder based his work mostly around one song of Blind Willie Johnson, or at least was very directly inspired by it: “Dark Was The Night – Cold Was The Ground”. It's a song without lyrics, but Johnson's slide guitar and his groaning say everything. An atmospheric masterpiece, the song is one of my all time favorite blues songs. Cooder called it “the most transcendent piece in all American music” and I won't argue with him. It is essential for any blues, and perhaps the quintessential pre-war blues song. In 1977, it was one of the tracks launched into space with the Voyager spacecraft to represent 20th century culture. Johnson had a powerful, raspy voice that immediately commands attention. In a way, most of his material is religious in nature, but as was said in the late 1920s about him: he had the power to make a religous song sound like the blues, and a blues song sound holy.

Johnsons life is shrouded in myth, even his year of birth and death are uncertain. At the age of seven he went blind, allegedly because his father beat up his stepmother after he caught her cheating, and as revenge she threw lye-water into the boy's face to blind him. Even before that, Johnson had already declared he wanted to become a preacher while having made his first guitar out of a cigar box, using the blade of a pocket knife as a slide. His father would take him to nearby towns and leave him to play on street corners with a tin cup tied to his neck. He started recording in 1927 and stopped in 1930. Late in the 1940s he survived a fire burning his home down. He proceded to live there though, slept on a mattress covered in newspapers to soak up the water from the fire hoses. He got pneumonia and died in late 1949 or early 1950. He died alone.

Favoriete nummers:
Jesus Make Up My Dying Bed, It's Nobody's Fault But Mine, Mother's Children Have A Hard Time, Dark Was The Night – Cold Was The Ground, If I Had My Way I'd Tear This Building Down, When The War Was On.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 10 nov 2011 17:37

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Geboren in 1948 in Chicago.

You might think you've never heard of this guy, but if you've seen Michael Mann's Public Enemies or even a trailer of said film, you've heard his “Ten Million Slaves”, which features prominently in both movie and advertisement.

I discovered Otis Taylor when he was playing a set at the 2003 North Sea Jazz festival in The Hague. He performed in the basement of the building, where there was no stage and the audience had to sit down so everybody could see the musicians. There could've been no better setting for him to showcase his unique brand of contemporary blues that he calls trance blues. This has little to do with the electronic music called trance, but his styles is named for it's hypnotic qualities. Taylor relies on repetitive rhythms and little variety of notes to create a wonderful atmosphere in an attempt to put the audience in a sort of trance. He does this with guitars, mandolins, banjo's (in fact, one of his more recent albums was Reclaiming The Banjo, since it was originally an African instrument) and other assorted string instruments.

Unlike many modern day blues players, Taylor sings a lot about contemporary and historical issues that play a part in American life, from racism (both against African-Americans and Native Americans) to rape to drugs to prostitution. The first album, that I bought off him after that concert in 2003, starts with a song about Rosa Parks, then tells a tale of Native Americans that tried to integrate into white American society but got killed for their efforts. A song that never fails to move me is “House of the Crosses”, about a prison guard that has to take care of a murderer that turns out to be his father because he once raped his mother. The final song on his latest album Clovis People, Vol. 3 (there are no other volumes, nor did there exist a Clovis people), “Think I Won't”, deals with a mother fending off a drugs dealer from a schoolyard with a knife. Not that the hurt of love gone wrong isn't a subject in his repertoire. But it's the homeless father unable to afford medical care for his dying 3 year old that stays with you, hugging her corpse while praying.

This summer I saw Otis Taylor live for the second time, again at the North Sea Jazz festival (now in Rotterdam). He is no longer performing in basements but for a large audience and with a lot of amps and noise. He rocks harder than ever, but a certain element is lost. The trance is now one of being overblown by the loudness of his guitar, rather than the relative quiet of his earlier performance. More headbanging, less mesmerizing. His records have never lost that hypnotic atmosphere though, and he still remains one of the eminent figures in the contemporary blues, having created his own unique, modern version of the blues without trying to update it by incorporating current popular genres.

Favoriete nummers:
Ten Million Slaves, Cold At Midnight, My Soul's In Louisiana, 3 Days & 3 Nights, Mama's Selling Heroin, They Wore Blue, Few Feet Away, Seven Hours of Light, Buy Myself Some Freedom, Rosa Rosa, Kitchen Towel, House of the Crosses, Nasty Letter, Ran So Hard the Sun Went Down, Hey Joe, Rain So Hard, Lee and Arnez, Think I Won't.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door PascalE » 10 nov 2011 17:42

:T Die kan ik door (helaas filmpjes van) het Northsea Jazz Festival ook waarderen. Wellicht juist door die ruigere aanpak. Ik zal zijn oudere platen ook eens beluisteren.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 11 nov 2011 01:34

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Geboren in 1902 in Mississippi, gestorven in 1988.

An intense singer, guitarist and performer, Son House helped to invent the modern blues and his fierce sound was an influence on almost everyone who came after him, from Robert Johnson to Muddy Waters. Brought up in a religious home, he became a Baptist preacher and didn't pick up the guitar until around 1927. The following year he was sentenced to a year on Parchman State Farm for manslaughter (he pleaded self-defense). On his release, House left the ministry and fully embraced the “devil's music”, although it was the probably the continuous tension between his spiritual and secular sides that gave his singing and playing it's intensity.

Having played with Charley Patton in several places, he recorded some songs in 1930, but even though they are now recognized as masterful they didn't sell at the time. During his travels in the 30's he met both Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters, among others, and taught them several guitar riffs including “Walking Blues”. In 1941 House was recorded by Alan Lomax for the Library of Congress. In 1943 he moved to Rochester, New York and by 1948 he had apparently given up music for a job with the railroad. In 1964 he was rediscovered. He had to relearn his old songs, but when he got his chops back his sound has lost none of its old intensity. He continued working ntil his second retirement in 1974.

The man who rediscovered Son House described him like this: “When he played, his eyes rolled back in his head and he went somewhere else... He transported himself back without any trickery and became the essence of the Delta. He would then finish the song, blink his eyes, and re-accustom himself to where he was at the time.”

Favoriete nummers:
Death Letter, Special Rider Blues II, American Defense, Walking Blues, Louise McGhee, Empire State Express, Grinnin' In Your Face, Sundown, Levee Camp Blues, Between Midnight and Day, I Want To Go Home On The Morning Train, How To Treat A Man, Son's Blues (20m), Yonder Comes My Mother, Sun Goin' Down.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 12 nov 2011 11:52

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Geboren in Mississipi in 1902, overleden in 1969.

I hadn't heard a whole lot of blues music (probably only the numer one and possibly two of this list), or at least not consciously, when the movie Ghost World was released in The Netherlands in February 2002. It contains the following scene, in which the main character and myself for a moment became complete aligned:



Here was this mesmerizing guitar playing, gliding over crackle & hiss (that all versions of the original 1931 recording have), and then this amazing high pitched voice wails over the guitar playing. I could hardly understand the words, something about a devil and a woman, but I was immediately pulled into this other world, completely different from my own 21st century Dutch surroundings. It was like Skip James reached out from 1930s Mississippi and directly touched my soul. Such is the power of “Devil Got My Woman”. In fact, very few things in life come close to the bone chilling beauty of this song, in my opinion.

Skip James had a lot of odd jobs before he became a recording artist, working with road construction and levee-building camps as well as in lumber and saw-mill camps. He sharecropped and made “white lightnin'” bootleg whiskey in the 1920s. In 1931 he had his only recording session of his prewar career. He recorded at least eighteen and possibly 26 sides, of which eighteen survive. In the 1960s he was rediscovered like quite a few others and recorded a number of records, mostly playing the same songs as in 1931. The sound quality of the original 1931 recordings sometimes suffers greatly, being as the masters have long been lost and the only sources are old 78's. Still, as great as the 1960s records are with thier much improved fidelity and all that jazz, and ol' Skip is still very intense and good, the haunting quality of those 1931 songs were never completely recaptured. If you want to hear more, I suggest trying both to see for yourself. Because some songs do benefit from the 1960s versions, in my opinion, like “Hard Time Killing Floor Blues”. But for “Devil Got My Woman”, only one version matters.

Favoriete nummers:
Devil Got My Woman, Cypress Grove Blues, Hard Time Killing Floor Blues, Cherry Ball Blues, Illinois Blues, Yola My Blues Away, I'm So Glad, Broke & Hungry, Bad Whiskey, Goin' Away To Stay, Drunken Spree, Black Gal, Washington D.C. Hospital Center Blues, Special Rider Blues, Worried Blues, Sickbed Blues, Catfish Blues, Good Camp Road Blues, Motherless & Fatherless, All Night Long.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Isadora » 12 nov 2011 21:07

Komt Willie Love nog voor in je lijstje Kurz? Hij is dan wel pianist maar hij heeft wel veel samen met Sonny Boy Williamson II samengewerkt.


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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 12 nov 2011 21:15

Ik vrees van niet. Heb eerlijk gezegd nog nooit solo werk van hem gehoord.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Isadora » 12 nov 2011 22:34

Colonel_Kurz schreef:Ik vrees van niet. Heb eerlijk gezegd nog nooit solo werk van hem gehoord.
Nou was hij voornamelijk actief als schrijver en achtergrond pianist voor diverse artiesten maar heeft zelf nog het één en ander opgenomen met z'n eigen band "Three aces". Heel magertjes is er eigenlijk alleen 1 compilatie album, Greenville Smokin genaamd van hem en de band uitgekomen. Dus van een omvangrijk oeuvre is allerminst sprake maar ik ben altijd overtuigd geweest dat hij nog meer liedjes heeft opgenomen maar dat dat gewoon nooit is uitgebracht.
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Als je overigens interesse hebt in het beluisteren van Greenville Smokin kun je me een PM sturen. :B:

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 13 nov 2011 00:31

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Geboren in Mississippi in 1915, gestorven in 1983.

Oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooh yeah

Oh yeah

Everything, everything, everything gon' be allright this morning

Oh yeah

Whew!


The pure joy of this intro to Mannish Boy sums up the infectious, sexy music of Muddy Waters for me. It also never fails to please. Muddy was perhaps the most influential of all the post-war bluesmen, defining the Chicago blues sound and being the main inspiration for certain British Invasion groups, one of which named themselves after his song “Rollin' Stone”. He was also the biggest blues star of the Chicago scene. It's still easy to hear why. His music is pure sex, from “Rollin' and Tumblin'” and “Got My Mojo Working” to more obvious songs like “I Just Want To Make Love To You” and “Hoochie Coochie Man”. He also had the greatest hair in his younger days: http://www.mirrorfilm.org/wp-content/up ... 0_7705.jpg

Muddy never really sounded hurt, even when he sang sad songs there was a raw force of life behind this that makes you feel that if a girl left him, it was more her loss than his. His singing is expressive, emotional but rarely mournful. He started his life on a Mississippi plantation as McKinley Morganfield and got his nickname from his grandmother for always playing in the creek. He started playing the harmonica at the age of thirteen and added guitar to his repertoire four years later under the influence of Charley Patton, Son House and Robert Johnson. Within a year Waters had mastered the jagged, intense sound of the bottleneck slide. In 1941 Alan Lomax recorded him, and two years later Waters gave up his then current job of tractor driving and moved to Chicago. Soon, he switched to electric guitar and in 1948 became the number one artist of a new record label callled Chess Records. His dark, majestic voice coupled with his electric guitar playing gave the blues sound a new exciting edge and compelling urgency. The next few years, he defined the sound of modern blues. Vital, visceral and earthy.

He often played with Little Walter on harmonica, Otis Spann on piano and Willie Dixon on bass (who also wrote most of his songs). Throughout the years Buddy Guy, Earl Hooker, Junior Wells, James Cotton, Pinetop Perkins and many others played in his band. Like no other Muddy Waters managed to keep himself in the public eye, during the boom of rock & roll, the folk-blues revival and then the re-appreciation of himself through the British Invasion. In the late '70s and early '80s he even recorded a couple of fine 'comeback' albums with Johnny Winter, before he died in '83.

Favoriete nummers:
I Can't Be Satisfied, Feel Like Going Home, Screamin' and Cryin', Rollin' and Tumblin', Rollin' Stone, Louisiana Blues, Long Distance Call, Baby Please Don't Go, Hoochie Coochie Man, I Just Want To Make Love To You, I'm Ready, My Home Is In The Delta, You Can't Lose What You Ain't Got, Mannish Boy, Rock Me, Got My Mojo Working, She's Nineteen Years Old, Close To You, All Aboard, Blow Wind Blow, Tom Cat (psychedelic version), I Got My Brand On You, I Wanna Put A Tiger In Your Tank, The Blues Had A Baby and They Named It Rock & Roll, Why Are People Like That, Born With Nothing, No Escape From The Blues, You Shook Me, The Same Thing.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 29 nov 2011 22:13

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Geboren in 1936 in Louisiana.

Eric Clapton once called him “by far and without doubt the best guitar player alive”. The man born George Guy made his first guitar from household implements and began copying records he heard on the radio. Now Buddy Guy's the best-known name in the blues after the upcoming nr. 2, with a track record stretching back half a century and more. His influences are numerous, but after he moved to Chicago in 1957 he became an influence himself, quickly establishing his name after beating both Magic Sam and Otis Rush in a “Battle of the Blues” contest. In 1960 he signed to market leader Chess Records, serving as a session guitarist for Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon, Howlin' Wolf, Little Walter, Sonny Boy Williamson and Koko Taylor. Under his own name he also recorded a number of fine sides, but Chess was uninterested in the new direction Guy was offering the blues so Guy left the label in the late '60s.

By then he had already made his first visit to England with the American Folk Blues Festival, performing with a power trio, inspiring Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix (who took his stage antics from Guy) to start similar acts. I myself only had the pleasure once, of seeing him live that is, in 2009, and it was the most impressive blues performances I've ever seen, despite it's short length and his age (73 at the time). Seeing him in tandem with another upcoming blues player felt sort of like a passing of the crown, meaning the moniker “King of the Blues”.

In 1965 Guy worked with Junior Wells for the first time, the start of a longtime partnership that was revived every few years and resulted in some fine albums. In the 1980s he established his own blues club, Legens, in Chicago and in the early 1990s he released a string of albums on Silvertone that got him new respect, fame and financial success. And he's basically continued to do so ever since. Just last year his 74 Years Young was yet another winner.

Favoriete nummers:
First Time I Met The Blues, My Time After Awhile, I Got a Strange Feeling, Watch Yourself, Stone Crazy, Untitled Instrumental, She Suits Me To a Tee, Mother-In-Law Blues, I Sing and Cry the Blues, Man and the Blues, One Room Country Shack, Crazy 'Bout You, I'll Take Care of You (w/ Junior Wells), Blues At My Baby's House, DJ Play My Blues, Give Me My Coat and Shoes (w/ Junior Wells), Sweet Black Girl (w/ Junior Wells), Digging My Potatoes (w/ Junior Wells), Ten Years Ago (w/ Junior Wells), I've Been There (w/ Junior Wells), Damn Right I've Got The Blues, Where Is The Next One Coming From, Five Long Years, Too Broke To Spend The Night, Black Night, Love Her With A Feeling, She's A Superstar, Feels Like Rain, She's Nineteen Years Old; Slippin' Out, Slippin' In; Man Of Many Words, Baby Please Don't Leave Me, She Got The Devil In Her, I Gotta Try You Girl, It's A Jungle Out There, Midnight Train, Skin Deep, 74 Years Young.

Favoriete albums:
Alone and Acoustic (1981), Damn Right, I've Got The Blues (1991), Sweet Tea (2001)

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 29 nov 2011 23:30

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Geboren in Mississippi in 1925.

I think that B.B. King was the second blues artist I'd ever heard, after the number one on this list. Some compilation spanning his long career. From the first notes of his guitar Lucille I was sold. The times when King uses it as an instrument to play solo's can be wonderful, but what he really makes his guitar playing great an influential on later generations is the way he uses it as a second voice: when a few licks of the guitar accompany every sung sentence as if King was having a conversation with himself. Incidentally, one of my favorite performances is a conversation between two guitars, B.B. King vs Gary Moore in 1983 in Montreal. It's the first video below. In some way it's odd that Moore died this year at the age of 58 while the 86-year old King is still performing around the world.

Although I do have to say his performance is not as strong as it used to be. When I saw his European Farewell Tour performance in Rotterdam a number of years ago, he was still awesome and impressive. But when I saw him at Woodstock (well, at the place where Woodstock was once held, not the actual nearby Woodstock) in 2009, he was no longer the same performer. Long stretches of idle old man talk coupled with songs abandoned halfway... it was still good because it was still B.B. King playing Lucille and every now and then there's a lick or short solo that's up to old standards, but... it's like the ending of The Wild Bunch: “It ain't like it used to be; but it'll do.” He's still B.B. King, creator of great music for over sixty years of recording and performing.

Riley B. King was born on a Mississippi cotton plantation. His first music experiences came in church, and by the age of twelve he'd formed a gospel vocal group and learned to play guitar from a local preacher. As an adult he started busking, while working as a sharecropper and a tractor driver. In 1946 he hitchhiked to Memphis, Tennessee with two and a half dollars to his name. He got his first big break two years later on the King Biscuit Hour radio program and soon had his own program. In 1949 he cut his first record and in 1951 his first hit, “Three O'Clock Blues”. He developed his style mostly on stage though throughout the 1950s and '60s, playing more than 300 nights a year. 1969 saw his biggest crossover pop hit, “The Thrill Is Gone”, after which he finally moved beyond the chitlin circuit (oddly both the folk-blues revival of the late 50's and the blues revival of the mid 60's had passed him by) and got recognition as one of the all-time great guitar virtuoso's. His star continued to rise in the 1970s while just about every other blues player went into decline, all the while maintaining his busy concert schedule, which didn't really change in the 1980s, culminating in collaborating with U2 on “When Love Comes To Town”. Even in his old age he vowed never to retire, saying that playing live was needed to boost record sales (“blues music doesn't get exposed on the radio like other types of music”) and because he feels he has nothing else he'd rather do than play the blues for people.

Favoriete nummers:
3 O'Clock Blues, You Upset Me Baby, Everyday I Have The Blues, Ten Long Years, Days of Old, How Blue Can You Get, Going Home, Help Poor Me, All Over Again, Paying The Cost To Be The Boss, Lucille, You Move Me So, Why I Sing The Blues, So Excited, You're Still My Woman, Chains and Things, Hummingbird, The Thrill Is Gone, Ghetto Woman, Ain't Nobody Home, To Know You Is To Love You, I Like To Live The Love, I'm Moving On, Riding With The King, You Shook Me, You're The Boss.

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Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door Colonel_Kurz » 01 dec 2011 01:31

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Geboren in Mississippi in 1917, gestorven in 2001.

It was the summer of 2001. I was 15 years old, and a few months removed from 16. It was a warm afternoon in June and I was lethargically flipping channels. Then at one point, I heard this sound. It seemed to come from another place and time, and to reach out and pull me into the television Videodrome style. This was the sound of John Lee Hooker, for he had just died and they were showing a documentary on him and his music. For a long time, this was my image of the blues: a lonely old man with one bed for himself and one for his guitar and his bottle of whiskey. John Lee Hooker is a “sheep out on the foam”*, drifting through the American landscape with just his guitar and the bottlecaps glues to his shoes to make a tapping sound and eliminate the need for a band.

And although he has overtime worked very well with bands, they sometimes have a hard time following him, for while a standard blues consists of twelve bars, but Hooker would just as easily play eleven or thirteen, depending on his whim, making him a tough act to back. His best stuff is usually him alone or with stark backing, allowing him full room for his idiosyncratic playing style and guitar work, that usually features notes repeated several times in a row with amazing effect. In the same way, he often repeats words or phrases more than most blues singers, with haunting effect. That said, one of my favorite recordings of him, that introduced his work in full to me, is a 1992 version of “Boom Boom” (found on the album of the same name) with Jimmy Vaughan on lead guitar. This rocking version of the song was an easy introduction to the world of the blues for me.

Hooker was born in 1917 in a place very near Clarksdale, Mississippi (of the famous crossroads where Robert Johnson supposedly sold his soul). At the early age of four Hooker started skipping school and going into the woods to play a one-stringed instrument of his own making. When his mother divorced his father, he was the only child to go with his mother and his stepfather gave him an actual guitar and instructed him on the machine. At fourteen he ran away to Detroit to join the army but was thrown out for lying about his age and sent back to Mississippi. By the mid-30s he made it to Memphis, and in the early 1940s found his way up to Detroit again, working in a car factory by day and playing and singing at house parties and in the clubs by night. Here he developed his trademark style, keeping the beat with his feet and twangy guitar and stuttering singing.

In 1948 he had a million dollar seller with “Boogie Chillun”, but scarcely made any money from that due to the fact that he hadn't learned to read and signed very detrimental contracts. He compensated for that by recording under dozens of names with every little label in town, recording as John Lee Booker, Delta John, Johnny Williams, The Boogie Man, Texas Slim, Johnny Lee and other names. This is part of the reason why there are so many versions of the same songs by his hand, although due to his idiosyncratic way of playing he never played them exactly the same. For a fan like me, every version has something new, even if there are hundreds of them. Other hits in that time were “Crawling King Snake”. In the 1960s he started recording solely under his own name and had hits with songs like “Dimples” and “Boom Boom”. The folk blues revival had him returning to a stark solo sound. The 70s were a very dark period for Hooker, but at the end of the 80s his career got a kick in the teeth with The Healer and subsequent succesful albums, allowing to live in comfort in the last stage of his career and life.

* = The phrase is probably supposed to be 'ship out on the foam', the foam being the sea, but Hooker sings 'sheep', making for a remarkable image that Van Morrison would one day copy.

Favoriete nummers:
Boogie Chillun', Sally Mae, Who's Been Jiving You, Crawlin' Kingsnake, I'm In The Mood, Leave My Wife Alone, Dimples, So Excited, I Love You Honey, Maudie, Every Night, Time Is Marching, Baby Lee, I Need Some Money, I'm Wanderin', Gonna Use My Rod, Democrat Man, No More Doggin', That's My Story, No Shoes, Canal Street Blues, Bluebird, Tupelo, Baby Please Don't Go, Little Dreamer, It Serves You Right To Suffer, Make It Funky; One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer; Backbiters and Syndicators, Boom Boom, I'm Bad Like Jesse James, When My First Wife Left Me, Teachin' The Blues, Country Boy, Never Get Out of These Blues Alive, I Wish You Could Change Your Ways, One Room Country Shack, T.B. Sheets, Drug Store Woman, Bar Room Drinking, Highway 13, Chill Out, Woman On My Mind, The Healer, Think Twice Before You Go, Trick Bag (Shoppin' For My Tombstone), Hittin' The Bottle Again, Don't Look Back.

Favoriete albums:
I'm John Lee Hooker (1956), That's My Story (1960), Alone (1976)

Voorbeelden:




En hier is een fantastische, lange versie met Van Morrison samen:
http://youtu.be/O23x02dS8P8?t=30m5s


DrMabuse
Oscar winnaar
Oscar winnaar
Berichten: 2183
Lid geworden op: 15 dec 2011 23:30

Re: The Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits

Bericht door DrMabuse » 20 dec 2011 06:03

Bessie Smith - Careless Love Blues (1925) _O_

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iympOhi ... re=related

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